Thursday, February 23, 2017

How Food and Fatigue are Connected

Fatigue can be affected by the foods you eat just like a high energy level is linked to certain energy boosting foods. Scientists have done lots of research establishing that there is a connection between mood and food and have shown that certain types of foods add to fatigue. There are certainly other causes of fatigue besides diet, but if you are chronically tired, making some adjustments to your diet is an easy way to get some relief and the extra energy to keep going. We all have times when we are extra tired, but we recover quickly with a little extra sleep. The real problems come from chronic fatigue which affects about 10% of the world population. Causes of fatigue of this nature can stem from medical problems such as thyroid dysfunction, hypoglycaemia, anaemia, being underweight or overweight, anxiety, depression, insomnia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. If a medical condition is behind your chronic fatigue, then you certainly need to work with your healthcare provider to treat it, but you can also be aware of energy foods and non-energy foods to help you cope.

Food and Energy Level
Simple carbohydrates and sugars can cause unbalanced blood sugar levels and contribute to fatigue and tiredness. This happens because foods such as these that have a high glycemic index cause your blood sugar level to go up, making your pancreas have to release insulin to help stabilize your level. The more your body experiences unstable blood sugar levels and the harder it has to work to rebalance these levels, the less energy it has for other tasks. If you suffer from chronic fatigue, an easy natural solution is to start making changes in your diet by avoiding the simple carb and sugary foods that contribute to fatigue and increase the energy foods you eat.

Energy Boosting Foods
According to Robyn Hussa, from Mental Fitness, Inc., adding protein and healthy fats to your diet will help give you more stable energy levels. While it's true that carbs and sugar can provide a quick pick-me-up, this type of energy is short-lived with a burst of energy as blood sugar levels spike, followed by a crash in blood sugar and drastic decrease in energy. The body metabolizes and uses these types of foods up in around an hour. Mehmet Oz, MD, advises eating a natural source of simple carbs, such as fruits and honey, if you need that quick energy boost. Since fruit has fiber and lots of good nutrients, they stay with you longer, but to get an energy boost that stays with you longer, complex carbs such as whole grains and starchy vegetables are better. Alternative medicine expert, Yogi Cameron Alborzian, adds that eating small amounts of natural foods helps boost energy levels and keep them stable. This works two ways. One, by eating smaller amounts, the body doesn't have to expend as much energy in digesting the food and two, eating natural foods provides the nutrients our bodies need for energy with less calorie intake. Kirsi Paalanen, nutrition expert, advises eating leafy green vegetables like spinach and kale to increase energy because they have iron that increases oxygen to the body cells and boosts energy. Leafy greens also are rich in magnesium that helps promote sleep and getting the right amount of quality sleep helps with fatigue. Dehydration can also contribute to fatigue so make sure you are getting plenty of good, pure water throughout the day. If you experience chronic fatigue or just find yourself tired a lot of the time, you should make sure your diet includes proteins, iron, vitamin C and magnesium. Amino acids, of which protein is built, is vital in keeping cells healthy. You can of course get protein by eating foods such as meat, fish, dairy, nuts and beans, but did you know that eating AFA bluegreen algae gives you all the amino acids your body needs with a profile make-up nearly identical to that found in mother's milk?

Dietary Changes To Boost Energy
For sustained energy, eating foods that keep blood sugar levels stable and that cause the body to work less in the digestion process can help. You can give your body an edge as to the amount of energy it uses digesting foods by adding a digestive enzyme supplement into your regimen. By adding more enzymes that you may not be getting from foods alone, your body gets support to breakdown foods into forms it can use for energy. Also avoid foods that destroy the enzymes your body has already or gets from food sources by choosing healthy fats over transfats and saturated fats and avoiding junk foods, processed foods and foods with refined sugars. Michael Roizen, MD also advises eating foods daily that will provide 25 grams of fiber, 31 milligrams of flavonoids, four to five servings of fruits and of vegetables and the right amount of calories, vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients for your body's height and build. He also recommends eating fish three times a week.

Just making a few changes in what you eat can go a long way to giving you energy that will last all day. If you are experiencing ongoing fatigue, it is a good idea to check with your healthcare provider to see if there is a medical condition behind it. If your fatigue is not chronic or medical conditions have been ruled out, then really start paying attention to the types of foods you eat and when you eat them. Making these dietary changes can get you back up and active with all the energy you need to do all you want to do.



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Sources:
http://www.sharecare.com/health/energy-boosters/which-foods-boost-energy#cmpid=SCNL000
http://www.livestrong.com/article/361455-foods-that-cause-fatigue/
http://www.nutritionist-resource.org.uk/articles/tiredness.html

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